March 9, 2021

Everybody’s Irish on St Patrick’s Day!

Everybody’s Irish on St Patrick’s Day!

We are coming up on a year since Covid changed all of our lives and drove us into the shelter of our homes. In the United States, that means that the very first holiday we missed out on was St. Patrick’s Day.

Although things are not yet back to “normal”, we can still find safe ways to celebrate the holidays and events we missed out on last year . One way to celebrate St. Patrick’s day is to travel to one of our great staycation destinations, like our Dharma Suites Hoboken properties at Novia .

From there, you can take a free limo ride to Willie Mcbride’s, where you can dine on American and Irish fare outside in one of their heated igloos. (Igloos are on a first come, first serve basis.)



Don’t worry about all those extra calories; you can work off those pints of Guinness at Novia’s on-site yoga studio.

If going to a pub is not on your list of ways to celebrate, you can stay inside one of our fully equipped suites and make a traditional Irish meal.If going to a pub is not on your list of ways to celebrate, you can stay inside one of our fully equipped suites and make a traditional Irish meal.

One of the staples of an Irish meal, for me, is soda bread . In America, it is sometimes difficult to find anywhere that sells soda bread around St. Patrick’s Day, at least the way I had it as a kid, plain without the raisins and various fruits and nuts people seem to love to put in it in America. So this year, I’ve decided to make it for myself.

According to The Society for the Preservation of Irish Soda Bread, Soda bread wasn’t invented by the Irish, but by Native Americans. The Irish, however, were quick to incorporate this bread into their diet, as it does not require yeast, but instead uses bicarbonate of soda to make the dough rise.

Today, we are encouraged to “save a spot on the table for Irish soda bread to remember how far the Irish have come from the days when it was the only thing on the table to today when our tables are filled with good things to eat and thoughts of the Famine years (An Gorta Mor) are long forgotten.”

This year I will put Irish Soda Bread on my table, and hope for the day when we are able to safely share our tables with all the friends and family we can gather around us.
Recipe: Irish Soda Bread by The Society for the Preservation of Irish Soda Bread
White Soda Bread (reminder: 4oz by weight is a dry "cup")
4 cups (16 oz) of all purpose flour.
1 Teaspoon baking soda
1 Teaspoon salt
14 oz of buttermilk

Method:
Preheat the oven to 425 F. degrees. Lightly crease and flour a cake pan.
In a large bowl sieve and combine all the dry ingredients.
Add the buttermilk to form a sticky dough. Place on floured surface and lightly knead (too much allows the gas to escape)
Shape into a round flat shape in a round cake pan and cut a cross in the top of the dough.
Cover the pan with another pan and bake for 30 minutes (this simulates the bastible pot). Remove cover and bake for an additional 15 minutes.
The bottom of the bread will have a hollow sound when tapped so show it is done.
Cover the bread in a tea towel and lightly sprinkle water on the cloth to keep the bread moist.White Soda Bread (reminder: 4oz by weight is a dry "cup")
4 cups (16 oz) of all purpose flour.
1 Teaspoon baking soda
1 Teaspoon salt
14 oz of buttermilk

Method:
Preheat the oven to 425 F. degrees. Lightly crease and flour a cake pan.
In a large bowl sieve and combine all the dry ingredients.
Add the buttermilk to form a sticky dough. Place on floured surface and lightly knead (too much allows the gas to escape)
Shape into a round flat shape in a round cake pan and cut a cross in the top of the dough.
Cover the pan with another pan and bake for 30 minutes (this simulates the bastible pot). Remove cover and bake for an additional 15 minutes.
The bottom of the bread will have a hollow sound when tapped so show it is done.
Cover the bread in a tea towel and lightly sprinkle water on the cloth to keep the bread moist.